Sunday, 22 April 2018 11:07

ENVIGUARD on SEAFISH aquaculture meeting

Written by A.Magno
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One of Seafish's primary aims is to ensure a sustainable, socially responsible future for the UK seafood industry. The organisation funded by a levy on the first sale of seafood products in the UK is committed to responsible sourcing throughout the supply chain, which involves protecting resources, fish stocks and ecosystems; supporting the development of sustainable marine aquaculture methods; facilitating well informed sourcing policies and promoting best environmental practice.

The Aquaculture Common Issues Group, facilitated by Seafish, aims to discuss and inform positions on some of the sector's most important issues. In April this year the Aquaculture Common Issues Group (ACIG) meeting took place in London, UK. The ACIG is an open forum and is an amalgam of interested parties drawn together to inform a wide-range of stakeholders by enabling information sharing. This group covers a wide range of aquaculture issues from both the UK and overseas. Their activities can be found on the following link: http://www.seafish.org/industry-support/aquaculture/aquaculture-groups/aquaculture-common-issues-group

Because ACIG and its members have a particular interest in shellfish aquaculture, ENVIGUARD project was invited for the meeting to present the project results and update the end-user requirement study with data from this specific stakeholder group.

Ines Pimparel from AquaBioTech Group joined to the meeting and held a presentation about the whole project and introduced the latest research results. She also distributed questionnaires to the participants and facilitated discussions about the monitoring requirements of shellfish farmers.

Around 50 end-users attended the meeting from different fields such as researchers, farmers and regulatory bodies. The attendees showed interest in the costing of the prototypes and their functioning. One of the attendees inquired if a possible evolution of the chemical sensor, to measure heavy metals would be possible, as this parameter affects shellfish farms in UK and later human health. The audience showed particular interest in the algae sensor and its capability to detect so many microalgae species.

Read 95 times Last modified on Thursday, 31 May 2018 12:33

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logo1This project has received funding from the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme
for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 614057
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